Meaning "enter unlawfully" is first attested in forest laws of Scottish Parliament (c. 1455). Meaning "enter unlawfully" is first attested in forest laws of Scottish Parliament (c. 1455). Meaning "to violate (a law), to make a moral false step, to commit a crime" is from late 14c. Some etymologists believe the Germanic word was an early borrowing directly from the Latin genitive. trespass (v.) c. 1300, "transgress in some active manner, commit an aggressive offense, to sin," from Old French trespasser "pass beyond or across, cross, traverse; infringe, violate," from tres-"beyond" (from Latin trans; see trans-) + passer "go by, pass" (see pass (v.)). a wrongful entry upon the lands of another. c. 1300, "transgress in some active manner, commit an aggressive offense, to sin," from Old French trespasser "pass beyond or across, cross, traverse; infringe, violate," from tres- "beyond" (from Latin trans; see trans-) + passer "go by, pass" (see pass (v.)). In 16c., misprision of treason was used for lesser degrees of guilt (those not subject to capital punishment), especially for knowing of treasonable actions or plots without assenting to them, but not informing the authorities. Etymology 1 . Trespass is first attested as a noun in the late 1200s, naming a “transgression,” “breach of the law,” “offense,” or “sin.” The trans- in transgression is operative here, as trespass comes from the French trespasser, literally “to pass across.” It ultimately joins the Latin trans (beyond, across) and passus (step, pace). History and Etymology for trespass Verb Middle English, from Anglo-French trespasser to overtake, exceed, wrong, from tres to a high degree (from Latin trans beyond) + … To live in sin "cohabit without marriage" is from 1838; used earlier in a more general sense. In general, "criminal neglect in respect to the crime of another," especially in connection with felonies, to indicate a passive complicity, as by concealment. This page was last edited on 25 October 2020, at 18:54. Related: Trespasses. Meaning "to wound the feelings of, displease, give displeasure to, excite personal annoyance or resentment in" is from late 14c. "the sin is real" (compare Gothic sonjis, Old Norse sannr "true"), from PIE *snt-ya-, a collective form from *es-ont- "becoming," present participle of root *es- "to be.". offense, sin, trespass. The literal sense of "to attack, assail" (late 14c.) is obsolete, but it is somewhat preserved in offense and offensive. Sin-eater is attested from 1680s. See trespass, n. From Old French trespas (“ passage; offense against the law ”), from trespasser. early 14c., offenden, "to disobey or sin against (a person, human or divine)," a sense now obsolete, from Old French ofendre "hit, attack, injure; sin against; antagonize, excite to anger" and directly from Latin offendere "to hit, thrust, or strike against," figuratively "to stumble, commit a fault, displease, trespass against, provoke," from assimilated form of ob "in front of against" (see ob-) + -fendere "to strike" (found only in compounds; see defend). The Modern French descendant of Old French trespasser, trépasser, has come to be used euphemistically for "to die" (compare euphemistic use of cross over, and obituary). Borrowed into Middle English from Old French trespas (“passage; offense against the law”), from trespasser. We also store some third-party cookies for marketing purposes; you can read about these in our Cookie Policy By continuing to use our site, we will assume you are happy for us to use cookies. Related: Poached; poaching. Another word for trespass. (unintentional) error or (wilful) transgression -- fall, fault, offence, sin, trespass. Trespass use cookies to improve your website experience. Meaning "enter unlawfully" is first attested in forest laws of Scottish Parliament (c. 1455). Find more ways to say trespass, along with related words, antonyms and example phrases at Thesaurus.com, the world's most trusted free thesaurus. From Old French trespasser (“to go across or over, transgress”), from tres- (“across, over”) + passer (“to pass”). trespass To commit an aggressive offense; transgress in some active manner; offend; sin: with against: as, to trespass against the laws of God and man. Noun . an unlawful act causing injury to the person, property, or rights of another, committed with force or violence, actual or implied. Old English synn "moral wrongdoing, injury, mischief, enmity, feud, guilt, crime, offense against God, misdeed," from Proto-Germanic *sundiō "sin" (source also of Old Saxon sundia, Old Frisian sende, Middle Dutch sonde, Dutch zonde, German Sünde "sin, transgression, trespass, offense," extended forms), probably ultimately "it is true," i.e. Sense of "trespass upon another's preserves for the sake of stealing game; kill and carry off game in violation of the law" is attested from 1610s, perhaps via the notion of "thrusting" oneself onto another's property, or perhaps from French pocher "to pocket" (the property of another); see poach (v.2). From parapipto; a side-slip (lapse or deviation), i.e. Related: Offended; offending; offendedness. trespass (countable and uncountable, plural trespasses) An intentional interference with another's property or person. the action to recover damages … Related: Trespassed; trespassing. trespass c. 1300, "transgress in some active manner, commit an aggressive offense, to sin," from Old French trespasser "pass beyond or across, cross, traverse; infringe, violate," from tres-"beyond" (from Latin trans; see trans-) + passer "go by, pass" (see pass (v.)). trespass (countable and uncountable, plural trespasses). a wrongful interference with the possession of property (personal property as well as realty), or the action instituted to recover damages, entry to another's property without right or permission. trespass (third-person singular simple present trespasses, present participle trespassing, simple past and past participle trespassed), Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary, legal: to enter someone else's property illegally, External infrastructure issues such as severe weather and, Network Rail has produced a free downloadable comic highlighting the consequences of railway, The entire police force has in effect been, https://en.wiktionary.org/w/index.php?title=trespass&oldid=60950191, English terms inherited from Middle English, English terms derived from Middle English, Requests for review of French translations, Requests for review of Dutch translations, Requests for review of Mandarin translations, Requests for review of Slovak translations, Requests for review of Spanish translations, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.

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